Saturday, December 30, 2006

Fishing Vacation

Fishing Vacation

Fishing Vacation 101
By Mansi Aggarwal

Universally, the term “gone fishing” is associated with vacations. In that case planning a fishing vacation should be nothing more then a natural choice. Fishing combines sport, relaxation, communing with nature and free food and hence qualifies as the perfect vacation. From a weekend trip to the closest lake front camping ground to an adventurous and long packaged tour to the best fishing locales of the world, one has plenty of choices that could be made.

While planning a long fishing vacation, there are a couple of obvious choices to be made. First one being what type of fishing is most appealing. The most basic breakdown here is a choice between freshwater and saltwater fishing.

Fishing vacations come in various sizes and forms. They can be started with loading your car with fishing rods and sleeping bags or calling a travel agent or professional fishng guide.

These trips can be taken all the year round. Although the first thought is generally to catch the bass biting at the very onset of spring or the blues running in autumn. Trips can be made absolutely anytime of the year, even in the dead of the winter, just in case he angler has no aversions to cutting holes in the ice.

A properly planned vacation can be fun for all, irrespective of whether you are a novice or a very serious sportsman. The only essential purchase required is the fishing license, rest all can be rented. Rods and reels, boats and crews, which can even cater lunch, can be rented out.

It can be a way for families to spend time together while simultaneously enjoying the outdoors. Although the idea of skewering worms onto hooks may sound gross yet the vacation can be fun for the entire family. Fishing is a leisurely pastime and you don’t have to excel at it to enjoy, and a total beginner might be just as good or even more than a seasoned pro.

Just because you are vegetarian, doesn’t mean you can’t have fun while fishing. One may use catch and release techniques for the fun of the sport.

While as said earlier, their can be several ways of going for fishing, however packaged tours certainly has some advantages. Best part here being that all the essentials are included right in the price. One need not carry all the equipment around, and thus the trip becomes more fun. Along with the trip, the vacationer also gets the expertise of the trip provider. Thus one need not hunt around for the best ‘fishing hole’ and thus the chances of returning empty handed are considerably reduced. Also at fairly reasonable prices one may also get lunch included in the package deal.

Toughest decision to be made while planning a trip is, where to go. Think globally as ther are plenty of scenic fishing spots which are a real treat for anyone interested. British Columbia in Canada boasts of beautiful wilderness and streams filled with great number of fishes of an ample of species.

There are also the less exotic but easier on the pocket destination which can be good value for money. Prices for accommodations may range from 100$ to 300$.

One may also like to make it a learning experience, by opting for a Fishing School package. It generally includes hands-on and personal tutoring regarding the ins and outs of fishing. All the equipment is provided by the school. Prices may be around 300$ per session, travel expenses excluded.

Mansi aggarwal writes about fishing vacation.

For The Love Of The Outdoors

Robin and Val

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Thursday, December 21, 2006

Winter Largemouth Bass Fishing

By Anthony Zruna

You go to your favorite fishing hole. About 5 feet deep and plenty of structure, your go-to place for largemouth bass. It is the middle of winter and you go cast your line out to this favourite honey-hole of yours. You fish all day with not one bite. What happened? Well, I am going to tell you. There two things that effect bass drastically in the winter, the epilimniom and the metabolism of the bass.

Epilimniom, what's that? Has anyone ever told you that largemouth bass live most of their lives in water that is 5 feet deep or less? Well, they are right... somewhat. Through spring and summer the first 5 feet of water is the warmest depth and is called the epilimniom. The epilimniom is formed by the sun warming the water and the surface air temperature. During the late fall the weather becomes cold and forces the epilimniom to sink to deeper water. Now, the coldest part of the lake is the first 10 feet deep, and the warmest part of the lake is 10 feet + deep. So in early winter and late fall bass can be near any structure in 10feet + deep water. During mid-winter and late winter, though, oxygen levels decrease in deeper water causing the fish to find a happy medium between warmth and oxygen levels. Usually this will be around 10 feet.

Ok, now what about the metabolism of largemouth bass. In the winter, or when the temperature of the water becomes cold, the bass' metabolism lowers greatly, forcing them to eat only small traces of whatever floats by them. Use small soft plastic lures rigged split shot, or jig head style coloured smoke or any other subtle colour

Now lets recap: Late Fall/Early Winter:

* Largemouth bass are located 10+ feet of water.

* Use a slow retrieve

* Use small soft plastic lures with subtle colours

* Use split shot style or jig head style rig

Mid Winter/Late Winter:

* Largemouth bass are located 10 feet of water.

* Use a slow retrieve

* Use small soft plastic lures with subtle colours

* Use split shot style or jig head style rig


For more information on largemouth bass fishing go to Largemouth Bass Fishing Tips Online

For The Love Of The Outdoors

A couple of great articles on Bass Fishing

Largemouth Bass Fishing With Monster Worms


Robin and Val

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Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Ice Fishing Safety

Ice Fishing Safety

The Risks of Ice Fishing
By Robbie Darmona

Ice fishing is perhaps the most dangerous type of fishing. It contains many risks for the fisherman due to the weather conditions. If you are heading for this eskimo sport anyway, you’d better read carefully through the following tips.

First of all, ice fishing is extremely dependent on weather. This means that before going on the open ice, you need to have supplied yourself with many useful cold-protecting materials. Of highest importance is to have a properly constructed ice shack. The shack can become your only rescue place from the cold outside: ice fishing leads to health problems such as hypothermia if you don’t have a warm and cosy shack.

The second thing you need to have in mind before going ice fishing is to carefully check the weather conditions. Walking on thin ice is a beautiful metaphor that can easily become a brutal reality if you don’t consult with the weather prognosis. Bear in mind the condition of the ice. Be careful where you put your ice shack, and double check the ice surface before going too far. Ice fishing is dangerous because sometimes winter conditions change too fast. You have to be aware that a winter blizzard would be a lethal possibility.

Your shack is not a perfect rescue from all weather conditions, a blizzard may cut your way and you may get stuck in the middle of nowhere in the dreadful cold. When ice fishing, you need to pay special attention to the stove or the other heating device within the shack. Make sure you have enough wood. Take even more than enough to reduce the risk of freezing to death in an unpredicted blizzard. The other rule for stoves when ice fishing is to make sure the heat doesn’t thaw the ice underneath. Put your stove on a proper place where no dangers of heating the ice surface exist. Don’t stay too long in the open when ice fishing: you have to go into the shack periodically and check if everything is under control. The health risks that ice fishing puts fishermen into, can also be reduced by regularly warming yourself.

If still not dissuaded by these strict safety regulations, you may try ice fishing and discover how enjoyable it can be. It is really fun and exhilarating as long as you have in mind and prevent the things which may go wrong.


Article by Robbie Darmona - an article author who writes on a wide variety of subjects. For more information click Ice Fishing

For The Love Of The Outdoors

Robin and Val

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Monday, December 18, 2006

Winter Steelhead Fishing

Winter Steelhead Fishing

Winter Steelhead Fishing
By David Alan

As the temperatures dip below freezing and the snow begins to fly around the Great Lakes region some fisherman put their fishing equipment away, however some fisherman are just getting geared up to brave the cold and take on the rivers of the great lakes in pursuit of steelhead. Fishing in the winter on the Great Lakes can be brutal to say the least, but it also can be very rewarding. Often fishing in the winter means smaller crowds, bigger fish, and more fish. So what do you need to know to go fishing in the winter and what is the most productive way to fish in the winter months. You only need to know two words warmth and slow.

First, lets talk about warmth and how to stay warm when fishing when the temperature drops below freezing. A must have is 5 mm neoprene waders boot foot preferably these boots are heavier than the Gore-Tex and Fly-Weights, but when you are standing in water with ice floating on it you will be glad to have them. Next, you have to learn how to layer clothing and what types of clothing to layer.

Insulated Underwear – Spend the extra bucks for the good pair. This is probably the most important layer you’ll have on.

Fleece Wading Pants – There are many different kinds of fleece wading pants but find a pair that feels thick and have straps at the cuffs to keep them from rolling up.

Socks – I have found that there isn’t any better sock than wool. Always put a base layer sock on first under your wading pants then pull the wool sock over the bottom of your fleece pants.

Turtle Neck – A thick cotton turtleneck or wool turtleneck sweater can’t be beat as your middle layer.

Fleece Coat – Get yourself a really good fleece coat or jacket, one with waterproof arms is really nice it will help you completely dry.

Wading Jacket – Find a wadding jacket that is 100% waterproof preferably Gore-Tex, some wadding jackets have neoprene cuffs to keep water out.

Gloves – A good set of fingerless gloves with a mitten cover are great, they will allow you to tie your hooks and then cover your fingers when needed.

Head – Cover your head with something warm, most of the heat lost from your body is from your head. A Mad Bomber hat is a great addition; they may look a little funny but ask anyone who spends time in the cold how they feel. Or just a good fleece toboggan will work.

All right you’re dressed for the conditions, but how do you go about catching a Steelhead when the water is freezing cold and fish don’t want to move to bit. The technique is rather simple you need to slow your bait presentation way down if you are fly-fishing. The best way to do this is by adding more weight to your line and then dragging the bottom, which will slow your bait slower than the current. This presentation works best when the fish are extremely lethargic and not wanting to move too much. You need to cast your fly upstream then mend your line toward the fly to keep it moving slowly along the bottom. You will get snagged a lot but you will catch fish. Flies that seem to work the best when fishing cold weather are egg patterns, egg sucking leeches, sucker spawn, and nymphs.

Now the most important part of steelhead fishing in the winter is how to find them in the stream. You will want to be fishing the deepest slowest section of the river you are fishing. Fish tend to go to the deepest and slowest sections of a creek and pool up together during the winter months. Often if you find one fish there is a lot more there with it. Fish often hit very lightly in the winter so be mindful of your line and feel for the lightest of bites.

In conclusion, winter steelheading is great time, but you need to take some precautions to hit the stream in the cold of winter. Be extremely careful when fishing in the winter there is often ice on the banks and you can take a nasty spill. Also be careful when wading a fall in ice cold water can be deadly, if you do fall in get to your car and get dry quickly. Also ice build up on the guides of your rod can be a real pain, I have found that by either using lip balm, Vaseline, or even WD-40 can help keep the ice off. So instead of putting your fishing equipment away this winter keep your gear out and give winter steelheading a try. Just stay warm, safe, and most importantly have fun.

Owner of Penns Ads http://www.pennsads.com which is a community guide for all of central Pennsylvania.

For The Love Of The Outdoors

Robin and Val

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Sunday, December 17, 2006

Florida Winter Fishing

Florida Winter Fishing

Going To Southwest Florida For The Winter? Try These Hot Spots For Big Bass
By Charles White

Going To Florida For The Winter? Try These Places For Bass The Best Places In Southwest Florida To Fish

This is for those that go to Florida to get out of the cold and to fish for bass.

First, let me tell you a secret.......if you want more of a chance to catch a trophy size bass..10 pounds plus, try live shiners. For those like me, who wouldn't use a live bait even for a 20 pound bass then read on.

The Big T

Take Golden Gate Parkway to the end (going East) and turn left, go to Golden Gate Blvd. and turn right. Take Golden Gate Blvd to Everglades Blvd and turn right again. Take Everglades Blvd almost to the end and you'll see a primitive boat ramp on your left and usually some people fishing or camping. (about 8-10 miles from turning on this road)

Once you're in the water and heading out go to the right and fish that canal. I have caught some nice bass here using Zoom chartruese pepper lizard, Charlie's Twitchin Shad, salt and pepper and Berkly Blue fleck Power Worms.

Again, this is a great place to use shiners and have seen many 10 pound plus bass taken from here.

Golden Gate Canals

When on Golden Gate Parkway (not Blvd) and you're going east, you'll pass a bridge and see a big field with many cars or trucks on the right. You'll also see a primitive boat ramp. Put your boat in there and go left from the boat ramp. You'll come to a big opening, try fishing the little lake, so to speak there, then try the canals.

I have seen 10 pound plus bass taken from the little lake and canals both. Don't be surprised if you hook a nice tarpon or snook in the canals or lake, they are land locked and adapted to freshwater.

Again, for the live bait fisherman, this a great for shiners. I have used a Berkley Blue Fleck Worm, white buzzbaits and spinners here with great success.

Once you get to the main canal, you can go left again and go under the bridge and get to some good fishing where the canal bends about a mile from where you get in the main canal. It's pretty primitive out there with some nice fish.

Be careful right before you get to the bridge as sometimes it gets pretty shallow there. So go Slow by the bridge.

Seven Lakes

If you take 75 towards the east coast of Florida and go through the toll-booth, the next exit is route 29. Once you get there, turn right. Go about a hundred yards and you'll see a fence with a dirt road. There are seven little lakes there and any of them are good fishing. The one I like best is the last one on the right.

This again is great for shiners. I have caught bass on buzzbaits, spinners and Charlie's Twitchin shad there.

I heard the state might have closed this down to public fishing but it's worth checking out just incase they haven't.

Okeechobee

What can you say about Okeechobee that hasn't been said? You have to try this huge lake. Shiners of course is the best bait but I had good look with Charlie's Twitchin Shad there and Zoom Lizards.

I like the East end of the lake the best.

Mile Marker 52 on 75

If you go toward the East coast on 75 from Naples, when you hit mile marker 75, you'll see an opening with a dirt road (pay attention or you'll miss it.), go down the dirt road and go under the bridge you just went over and launch your boat there.

Once in the water, go left (South), you'll see a big sign that says "no tresspassing". This is Indian property. Go on down the canal, but DO NOT FOR ANY REASON go on the land. The Indians own the land but not the waterways.

Start fishing on the left side of the canal. Try using a zoom Chartruese 6" Lizard. The water will be shallow at the edges but there is a shelf within a few feet that is like 10 foot deep.

This is without a doubt one of the best places I have ever fished for bass. It's nothing to catch 20 bass a day here. I have one that is 6 1/2 pounds from here. I kept it because a gator decided he wanted it too.

Oh yeah, that is another thing, there are thousands of gators in the canal here.

This is my list of places to fish in Southwest Florida.

Try them, I think you'll like them.

Good Fishing To you!

Charles E. White has fished 50 years for bass from California to Florida. In his lifetime, it is estimated that he has caught over 6,000 bass. His biggest bass is a 12 pound 14 ounce that hangs on his wall in his office. His tips and techniques have helped many people who have never fished for bass before become successful anglers. He also has fished with the Pros in Florida. His website is at: http://www.bassfishingweekly.com

For The Love Of The Outdoors

Robin and Val

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posted by Robin Shortt at 5:22 PM 0 comments links to this post

Winter Fishing

Winter Fishing

How to Beat the Winter Fishing Doldrums
By Gary Higbee

Ever wonder what you can do to get a fishing "fix" in the winter if your not an ice fisherman and you live in the frigid north? Besides the obvious magazine reading, and shopping, here are a few ideas.

  • Clean your fishing rods and check for cracks - Everyone has had, or will have, a fishing rod break while the are fishing. Sometimes this cannot be avoided, but other times you can find these issues before the next season starts by wiping down your fishing rods and checking the guides for nicks, scratches, or cracks. If you find a crack in the rod, get a new one. I have never met someone who has repaired a graphite rod and been satisfied. If you cut it down it changes the action. If you try and wrap the cracked area it changes the action. If you have a crack in a guide, you can buy replacements and fix it. If you find a nick or scratch in a guide you might be able to polish it out with an emery cloth or diamond bit on a dremel.
  • Check your lures - Look over your lures for paint issues on wooden lures, rusty hooks, dull hooks, bent hooks, etc. All of these things can contribute to problems down the road. Consider upgrading hooks if you have a lot of bent or dull hooks. Some people buy brand new lures and change the hooks to a different brand due to the better quality.
  • Carve a lure - If your feeling adverturous you can purchase a chunk of balsa wood and try your hand at carving a lure. A basic lure is relatively easy to create and you can purchase all the metal hardware from a mailorder fishing catalog. It is quite satisfying to catch a fish on a lure you created yourself.
  • Start a fishing diary - This may sound crazy to some people but it can give you a great insight into what the fish are doing. Get a notebook, buy a computer program, join a website, or whatever other method you can think of, but start logging the weather conditions, lures used, fish caught, etc. This can give you a better handle on what needs to be done to catch fish in similar situations on other lakes, or at other times, and keeps you from forgetting.



For The Love Of The Outdoors

Robin and Val

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